XML Training Classes in Columbus, Ohio

Learn XML in Columbus, Ohio and surrounding areas via our hands-on, expert led courses. All of our classes are offered on an onsite, online and public instructor led basis. Here is a list of our current XML related training offerings in Columbus, Ohio: XML Training

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XML Training Catalog

cost: $ 790length: 2 day(s)
cost: $ 1190length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 2090length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 790length: 2 day(s)
cost: $ 790length: 2 day(s)
cost: $ 390length: 1 day(s)
cost: $ 790length: 2 day(s)

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In May 2012 Google Chrome hit a milestone. It kicked Microsoft's Internet Explorer into excess phone oh that oh that second place as the most used browser on planet Earth.
With Microsoft being in second place, it makes a dark hole for Firefox coming in at number three. Google likes to trumpet three key reasons: security, simplicity and speed.
Available for free on Android, Linux, Mac, and Windows. It gets its speed from the open source JavaScript engine written in C++ known as V8.
In my daily use I use Microsoft's Internet Explorer version 10, Apple's Safari (on OS X) and chrome on both Windows 8 and OS X.

Admittedly people do not know anything about Internet Explorer version 10 since you can only get it on Windows 8/RT.

I do not need a crystal ball to know that the Mother of All Browser Battles is set to begin in the fall of 2012 and beyond.

I have said this before and I'm going to say it again.

Checking to see if a directory exists and then creating it if it is not present requires a few lines of code.  Isn't Python great. enlightened  Begin by importing the os module and use the exists and makedirs functions.

 

import os

if os.path.exists(somedirectory):
   os.makedirs(somedirectory)



Python and Ruby, each with roots going back into the 1990s, are two of the most popular interpreted programming languages today. Ruby is most widely known as the language in which the ubiquitous Ruby on Rails web application framework is written, but it also has legions of fans that use it for things that have nothing to do with the web. Python is a big hit in the numerical and scientific computing communities at the present time, rapidly displacing such longtime stalwarts as R when it comes to these applications. It too, however, is also put to a myriad of other uses, and the two languages probably vie for the title when it comes to how flexible their users find them.

A Matter of Personality...


That isn't to say that there aren't some major, immediately noticeable, differences between the two programming tongues. Ruby is famous for its flexibility and eagerness to please; it is seen by many as a cleaned-up continuation of Perl's "Do What I Mean" philosophy, whereby the interpreter does its best to figure out the meaning of evening non-canonical syntactic constructs. In fact, the language's creator, Yukihiro Matsumoto, chose his brainchild's name in homage to that earlier language's gemstone-inspired moniker.

Python, on the other hand, takes a very different tact. In a famous Python Enhancement Proposal called "The Zen of Python," longtime Pythonista Tim Peters declared it to be preferable that there should only be a single obvious way to do anything. Python enthusiasts and programmers, then, generally prize unanimity of style over syntactic flexibility compared to those who choose Ruby, and this shows in the code they create. Even Python's whitespace-sensitive parsing has a feel of lending clarity through syntactical enforcement that is very much at odds with the much fuzzier style of typical Ruby code.

For example, Python's much-admired list comprehension feature serves as the most obvious way to build up certain kinds of lists according to initial conditions:

a = [x**3 for x in range(10,20)]
b = [y for y in a if y % 2 == 0]

first builds up a list of the cubes of all of the numbers between 10 and 19 (yes, 19), assigning the result to 'a'. A second list of those elements in 'a' which are even is then stored in 'b'. One natural way to do this in Ruby is probably:

a = (10..19).map {|x| x ** 3}
b = a.select {|y| y.even?}

but there are a number of obvious alternatives, such as:

a = (10..19).collect do |x|
x ** 3
end

b = a.find_all do |y|
y % 2 == 0
end

It tends to be a little easier to come up with equally viable, but syntactically distinct, solutions in Ruby compared to Python, even for relatively simple tasks like the above. That is not to say that Ruby is a messy language, either; it is merely that it is somewhat freer and more forgiving than Python is, and many consider Python's relative purity in this regard a real advantage when it comes to writing clear, easily understandable code.

And Somewhat One of Performance

Voice recordings are useful at any point in time. If you want to save a lecture (or presentation) that you are attending, or record a voiceover for a project, the iPhone can be your solution. You don’t have to use an old tape recorder, or a standalone recorder. The iPhone’s fantastic technology records high quality voice recordings on demand, whenever you need it.

To get started, look for an application named “Voice Memos.” Most likely, this particular application is found in your Utilities category by default. Once you open it up, you are greeted by a large microphone, indicating you are in the correct application. When you want to start recording, simply tap on the large red button in the bottom left, and you are on your way to begin recording. What is important about recording voices on this application to the highest degree of quality, ensure that your meter in the bottom is within the middle range; with the pointer in the red zone, your recording will be awfully loud, while otherwise, it will be too quiet. Finished recording? Simply tap on the square button, and you have your recording.

What can you do with these recordings? Once you have finished recording, you are able to now share this recording through email or even in a text message; email it to yourself so you can save it on your computer, and listen to it later, or start editing it to put into a movie production, or text it to a friend for their needs.

Tech Life in Ohio

Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, Benjamin Harrison, William McKinley, William H. Taft, and Warren G. Harding, were all U.S. Presidents born in Ohio. The first recognized university in Ohio was Ohio University founded in 1804. It wasn?t long until the first interracial and coeducational college in the United States, Oberlin, was founded in 1833. The Buckeye State produced some interesting discoveries such as: Charles Goodyear discovering the process of vulcanizing rubber in 1839; Roy J. Plunkett inventing Teflon in 1938; and Charles Kettering inventing the automobile self-starter in 1911.
Everything I do is kind of a lesson, even if I am the only person who learns it. Taylor Mali
other Learning Options
Software developers near Columbus have ample opportunities to meet like minded techie individuals, collaborate and expend their career choices by participating in Meet-Up Groups. The following is a list of Technology Groups in the area.
Fortune 500 and 1000 companies in Ohio that offer opportunities for XML developers
Company Name City Industry Secondary Industry
Nationwide Insurance Company Columbus Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Owens Corning Toledo Manufacturing Concrete, Glass, and Building Materials
FirstEnergy Corp Akron Energy and Utilities Gas and Electric Utilities
The Lubrizol Corporation Wickliffe Manufacturing Chemicals and Petrochemicals
Sherwin-Williams Cleveland Retail Hardware and Building Material Dealers
Key Bank Cleveland Financial Services Banks
TravelCenters of America, Inc. Westlake Retail Gasoline Stations
Dana Holding Company Maumee Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
O-I (Owens Illinois), Inc. Perrysburg Manufacturing Concrete, Glass, and Building Materials
Big Lots Stores, Inc. Columbus Retail Department Stores
Limited Brands, Inc. Columbus Retail Clothing and Shoes Stores
Cardinal Health Dublin Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotech Other
Progressive Corporation Cleveland Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Parker Hannifin Corporation Cleveland Manufacturing Manufacturing Other
American Financial Group, Inc. Cincinnati Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
American Electric Power Company, Inc Columbus Energy and Utilities Gas and Electric Utilities
Fifth Third Bancorp Cincinnati Financial Services Banks
Macy's, Inc. Cincinnati Retail Department Stores
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. Akron Manufacturing Plastics and Rubber Manufacturing
The Kroger Co. Cincinnati Retail Grocery and Specialty Food Stores
Omnicare, Inc. Cincinnati Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Pharmaceuticals
The Procter and Gamble Company Cincinnati Consumer Services Personal Care

the hsg library depth in learning

training details locations, tags and why hsg

the hartmann software group advantage
A successful career as a software developer or other IT professional requires a solid understanding of software development processes, design patterns, enterprise application architectures, web services, security, networking and much more. The progression from novice to expert can be a daunting endeavor; this is especially true when traversing the learning curve without expert guidance. A common experience is that too much time and money is wasted on a career plan or application due to misinformation.

The Hartmann Software Group understands these issues and addresses them and others during any training engagement. Although no IT educational institution can guarantee career or application development success, HSG can get you closer to your goals at a far faster rate than self paced learning and, arguably, than the competition. Here are the reasons why we are so successful at teaching:

  • Learn from the experts.
    1. We have provided software development and other IT related training to many major corporations in Ohio since 2002.
    2. Our educators have years of consulting and training experience; moreover, we require each trainer to have cross-discipline expertise i.e. be Java and .NET experts so that you get a broad understanding of how industry wide experts work and think.
  • Discover tips and tricks about XML programming
  • Get your questions answered by easy to follow, organized XML experts
  • Get up to speed with vital XML programming tools
  • Save on travel expenses by learning right from your desk or home office. Enroll in an online instructor led class. Nearly all of our classes are offered in this way.
  • Prepare to hit the ground running for a new job or a new position
  • See the big picture and have the instructor fill in the gaps
  • We teach with sophisticated learning tools and provide excellent supporting course material
  • Books and course material are provided in advance
  • Get a book of your choice from the HSG Store as a gift from us when you register for a class
  • Gain a lot of practical skills in a short amount of time
  • We teach what we know…software
  • We care…
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