LPIC-1 EXAM PREP (COURSE 1) Training

Upcoming Instructor Led Online and Public LPIC-1 EXAM PREP (COURSE 1) classes
LPIC-1 EXAM PREP (COURSE 1) Training/Class 2 December, 2019 - 5 December, 2019 $1890
HSG Training Center 1624 Market Street, Suite 202
Denver, CO 80202
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
We offer private customized training for groups of 3 or more attendees.

Course Description

 
This course prepares students to take the 101 exam of the LPI level 1 certification. The Linux Professional Institute (LPI) is the go to certification body for vendor independent Linux certifications. This course covers fundamental Linux skills such as file management and manipulation, text processing, command line use, package management, filesystems, hardware, and many more. Students will feel confident taking the LPI LPIC-1 101 exam with in classroom assessments and practice exams.
Course Length: 4 Days
Course Tuition: $1890 (US)

Prerequisites

General computing knowledge and experience. No prior knowledge with Linux is required.

Course Outline

 
  1. WORK ON THE COMMAND LINE
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. Role of Command Shell
    3. Shells
    4. Gathering System Info
    5. Identifying the Shell
    6. Changing the Shell
    7. Bourne Shell: Shell Prompts
    8. Bash: Bourne-Again Shell
    9. Navigating the Filesystem
    10. Help from Commands and Documentation
    11. Getting Help Within the Graphical Desktop
    12. Getting Help with man & info
    13. Bash: Command Line History
    14. Bash: Command Editing
    15. Bash: Command Completion
    16. Shell and Environment Variables
    17. Key Environment Variables
    LAB TASKS
    1. Help with Commands
    2. Linux Shells
    3. Shell Variables
    4. Bash History
    5. Aliases
  2. USE STREAMS, PIPES, AND REDIRECTS
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. File Redirection
    3. Piping Commands Together
    4. Filename Matching
    5. File Globbing and Wildcard Patterns
    6. Brace Expansion
    7. General Quoting Rules
    8. Nesting Commands
    9. Gotchas: Maximum Command Length
    LAB TASKS
    1. Redirection and Pipes
    2. Wildcard File Matching
    3. Shell Meta-Characters
    4. Command Substitution
  3. MANAGE FILE PERMISSIONS AND OWNERSHIP
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. Filesystem Hierarchy Standard
    3. Displaying Directory Contents
    4. Filesystem Structures
    5. Determining Disk Usage With df and du
    6. File Ownership
    7. Default Group Ownership
    8. File and Directory Permissions
    9. File Creation Permissions with umask
    10. Changing File Permissions
    11. SUID and SGID on files
    12. SGID and Sticky Bit on Directories
    13. User Private Group Scheme
    LAB TASKS
    1. Navigating Directories and Listing Files
    2. Disk and Filesystem Usage
    3. File and Directory Ownership and Permissions
  4. CREATE, DELETE, FIND, AND DISPLAY FILES
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. Directory Manipulation
    3. File Manipulation
    4. Deleting and Creating Files
    5. Physical Unix File Structure
    6. Filesystem Links
    7. File Extensions and Content
    8. Which and Type
    9. whereis
    10. Searching the Filesystem
    11. Alternate Search Method
    12. Manually Installed Shared Libraries
    LAB TASKS
    1. Manipulating Files and Directories
  5. WORK WITH ARCHIVES AND COMPRESSION
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. Archives with tar
    3. Archives with cpio
    4. The gzip Compression Utility
    5. The bzip2 Compression Utility
    6. The XZ Compression Utility
    7. The PKZIP Archiving/Compression format
    LAB TASKS
    1. Archiving and Compression
    2. Using tar for Backups
    3. Using cpio for Backups
  6. PROCESS TEXT STREAMS USING FILTERS
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. Producing File Statistics
    3. The Streaming Editor
    4. Replacing Text Characters
    5. Text Sorting
    6. Duplicate Removal Utility
    7. Extracting Columns of Text
    8. Displaying Files
    9. Previewing Files
    10. Displaying Binary Files
    11. Combining Files and Merging Text
    12. Using Checksum to Check File Integrity
    LAB TASKS
    1. Text Processing
    2. Processing Text Streams
  7. SEARCH TEXT FILES USING REGULAR EXPRESSIONS
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. Searching Inside Files
    3. Regular Expression Overview
    4. Regular Expression Implementations
    5. Regular Expressions
    6. RE Character Classes
    7. Regex Quantifiers
    8. RE Parenthesis
    LAB TASKS
    1. Pattern Matching with Regular Expressions
    2. Extended Regular Expressions
    3. Using Regular Expressions With sed
  8. BASIC FILE EDITING
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. Text Editing
    3. vi and Vim
    4. Learning Vim
    5. Basic vi
    6. Intermediate vi
    LAB TASKS
    1. Text Editing with Vim
  9. CREATE, MONITOR, AND KILL PROCESSES
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. What is a Process?
    3. Process Lifecycle
    4. Process States
    5. Viewing Processes
    6. Signals
    7. Tools to Send Signals
    8. Managing Processes
    9. Tuning Process Scheduling
    10. Job Control Overview
    11. Job Control Commands
    12. nohup and disown
    13. uptime & w
    14. Output monitoring with watch
    15. Persistent Shell Sessions with Screen
    16. Using screen
    17. Advanced Screen
    18. Persistent Shell Sessions with tmux
    LAB TASKS
    1. Job Control Basics
    2. Process Management Basics
    3. Screen Basics
    4. Using Screen Regions
  10. USE RPM, YUM, AND DEBIAN PACKAGE MANAGEMENT
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. Managing Software
    3. RPM Architecture
    4. Working With RPMs
    5. Querying and Verifying with RPM
    6. Installing Debian Packages
    7. Querying and Verifying with dpkg
    8. The alien Package Conversion Tool
    9. Managing Software Dependencies
    10. Using the Yum command
    11. Configuring Yum
    12. dnf
    13. Using the Zypper command
    14. The dselect & APT Frontends to dpkg
    15. Configuring APT
    LAB TASKS
    1. Working with RPMs on Ubuntu
    2. Querying the RPM Database
  11. WORK WITH PARTITIONS, FILESYSTEMS, AND DISK QUOTAS
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. Partition Considerations
    3. Logical Volume Management
    4. Filesystem Planning
    5. Partitioning Disks with fdisk & gdisk
    6. Resizing a GPT Partition with gdisk
    7. Partitioning Disks with parted
    8. Non-Interactive Disk Partitioning with sfdisk
    9. Filesystem Creation
    10. Filesystem Support
    11. Unix/Linux Filesystem Features
    12. Swap
    13. Selecting a Filesystem
    14. Filesystem Maintenance
    15. Mounting Filesystems
    16. Mounting Filesystems
    17. List Block Devices
    18. Managing an XFS Filesystem
    19. NFS
    20. SMB
    21. Filesystem Table (/etc/fstab)
    LAB TASKS
    1. Hot Adding Swap
    2. Accessing NFS Shares
  12. LINUX BOOT PROCESS
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. Booting Linux on PCs
    3. GRUB 2
    4. GRUB 2 Configuration
    5. GRUB Legacy Configuration
    6. Boot Parameters
    7. init
    8. Linux Runlevels Aliases
    9. Systemd local-fs.target and sysinit.target
    10. Runlevel Implementation
    11. System Boot Method Overview
    12. systemd System and Service Manager
    13. Modifying systemd services
    14. systemd Targets
    15. Using systemd
    16. Advanced Configuration and Power Interface
    17. Shutdown and Reboot
    18. System Messaging Commands
    19. Controlling System Messaging
    LAB TASKS
    1. Command Line Messaging
    2. Messaging with talkd
    3. Boot Process
    4. GRUB Command Line
    5. Basic GRUB Security
  13. DETERMINE AND CONFIGURE HARDWARE SETTINGS
    1. LPI Objectives Covered
    2. Managing Linux Device Files
    3. Hardware Discovery Tools
    4. Configuring New Hardware with hwinfo
    5. PC Architecture and Bus
    6. DMA & IRQ
    7. USB Devices
    8. USB Architecture
    9. Configuring Kernel Components and Modules
    10. Kernel Modules
    11. Handling Module Dependencies
    12. Configuring the Kernel via /proc/
    13. Kernel Hardware Info – /sys/
    14. /sys/ Structure
    15. Random Numbers and /dev/random
    LAB TASKS
    1. Adjusting Kernel Options
  1. LINUX FUNDAMENTALS
    1. Unix and its Design Principles
    2. FSF and GNU
    3. GPL – General Public License
    4. The Linux Kernel
    5. Components of a Distribution
    6. Red Hat Linux Products
    7. SUSE Linux Products
    8. Debian
    9. Ubuntu
    10. Logging In
    11. got root?
    12. Switching User Contexts
    13. Gathering Login Session Info
    LAB TASKS
    1. Login and Discovery
    2. Switching Users With su

Course Directory [training on all levels]

Upcoming Classes
Gain insight and ideas from students with different perspectives and experiences.

Linux Unix Uses & Stats

Linux Unix is Used For:
Desktop Mainframe Computers Mobile Devices Embedded Devices
Difficulty
Popularity
Year Created
1991/1971
Pros
Performance:
Linux supports many efficient tools and operates them seamlessly. Because it's architecture is lightweight it runs faster than both Windows 8.1 and 10. 
 
Security:
Because Linux is an open-source software,  anyone can contribute code to help enhance the users’ experience i.e., adding features, fixing bugs, reducing security risks, and more.
 
 
Software Development:
The terminal in Linux is a *wild card*. You can do almost anything with it. This includes software installation, application and server configurations, file system management, and etc.
 
Large-scale:
Open-source projects benefit from having an attentive community. As a result, Linux is more secure than Windows. Instead of installing anti viruses to clean malware, you just have to stick to the recommended repositories. 
 
Efficient: 
Developers have the convenience of running servers, training machine learning models, accessing remote machines, and compiling and running scripts from the same terminal window. 
 
Free: 
Linux is free (you can put it on as many systems as you like) and you can change it to suit your needs.
Cons
Learning Curve: 
Linux is not for everyone, there is a learning curve in switching to Ubuntu. To actually learn Linux efficiently would take a user one to several years.
 
No Tech Support:
Unlike Windows, there isn’t a dedicated tech support, so getting help for things is up to you. 
 
Designer Compatabilty:
Linux is not as user friendly as Windows or as ‘straight out of the box design’ As an example for design choices, Adobe hasn’t released any of its products to Linux users. So it’s impossible to run them directly. The Ubuntu alternative is a free software called GIMP. 
 
Gaming Capabilities: 
Most games aren’t available in Linux. But that’s not to say you can’t make it happen, it's just not as easy.   
Linux Unix Job Market
Average Salary
$85k-$105k
Job Count
n/a
Top Job Locations

New York City
Boston
San Francisco 

Complimentary Skills to have along with Linux Unix
The following are types of jobs that may require Linux skills.  The top 15 job titles on Dice.com that mention Linux in their postings are:
- DevOps Engineer
- Software Engineer
- Java Developer
- Systems Engineer
- Systems Administrator
- Senior Software Engineer
- Network Engineer
- Python Developer
- Linux Systems Administrator
- Software Developer
- System Administrator
- Linux Administrator
- Linux Engineer
- Senior Java Developer
- C++ Developer

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