Google for Business Training Classes in Pontiac, Michigan

Learn Google for Business in Pontiac, Michigan and surrounding areas via our hands-on, expert led courses. All of our classes either are offered on an onsite, online or public instructor led basis. Here is a list of our current Google for Business related training offerings in Pontiac, Michigan: Google for Business Training

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There has been and continues to be a plethora of observational studies by different researchers in the publishing industry focused on how e-books have affected hard-copy book sales. Evidence from these studies has indicated that there is a significant and monumental shift away from hard-copy books to e-books.[1]These findings precipitate fears that hard-copy books might become more expensive in the near future as they begin to be less available.  This scenario could escalate to the point where only collectors of hard-copy books are willing to pay the high price for ownership.

The founder of Amazon, Jeff Bezos, made a statement in July 2010 that sales of digital books had significantly outstripped U.S. sales of hard-copy. He claimed that Amazon had sold 143 digital books for its e-reader, the Kindle, for every 100 hard-back books over the past three months. The pace of this change was unprecedented;  Amazon said that in the four weeks of June 2010, the rate of sales had reached 180 e-books for every 100 hard-backs sold. Bezos said sales of the Kindle and e-books had reached a "tipping point", with five authors including Steig Larsson, the writer of Girl with a Dragon Tattoo, and Stephenie Meyer, who penned the Twilight series, each selling more than 500,000 digital books.[2] Earlier in July 2010, Hachette said that James Patterson had sold 1.1m e-books to date.

According to a report made by Publishers Weekly, for the first quarter of 2011, e-book sales were up 159.8%; netting sales of $233.1 million. Although adult hard-cover and mass market paperback hard-copies had continued to sell, posting gains in March, all the print segments had declined for the first quarter with the nine mass market houses that report sales. Their findings revealed a 23.4% sales decline, and that children’s paper-back publishers had also declined by 24.1%.[3] E-book sales easily out-distanced mass market paperback sales in the first quarter of 2011 with mass market sales of hard-copy books falling to $123.3 million compared to e-books’ $233.1 million in sales.

According to .net sales report by the March Association of American Publishers (AAP) which collected data and statistics from 1,189 publishers, the adult e-Book sales were $282.3 million in comparison to adult hard-cover book sales which counted $229.6 million during the first quarter of 2012. During the same period in 2011, eBooks revenues were $220.4 million.[4] These reports indicate a disconcerting diminishing demand for hard-copy books.

It’s befuddling when you think about how many ways there are to communicate in 2013. I’d say there are too many new ways to communicate – social media, phone, Skype, instant message, text message, email, it goes on and on. But do any of them outweigh the power of a good old-fashioned face-to-face meeting? Most business executives would argue no. Nothing can replace a face-to-face meeting, at least yet.

 

That said, face-to-face meetings are without question the most expensive kind, given the travel costs required to make them a reality, and companies around the globe have been trying to make them more financially manageable ever since the recession set in. But recession or no, face-to-face meetings are rarely in the budget cards for small businesses. So how can entrepreneurs around the globe get more out of their virtual meetings while ensuring any physical meeting is worth the cost?

  

Learning SQL development can seem like an overwhelming task at first. However, mastering just a few key points will help ease your way through 80 percent of the day-to-day challenges when writing stored procedures and solving common problems. Here are three important SQL development factors to keep in mind:


Outer Joins
One of the most crucial things to understand in SQL server are joins. Joins are a way to retrieve data from two or more tables based on logical relationships between them. Joins dictate how Microsoft SQL Server ought to use data from one table to select the rows in another table.

In my experience inner joins are intuitive while outer joins can present additional hours of grief by overlooking associations in the other table(s). The outer join is the key to answering questions about what the database does not have. For example, if you need to make a query to display all the students who are without report-cards, you’ll need a left join to get all students coupled with a “where clause” to return the ones who have nulls for their report card table columns in the results.

Many talented Java script programmers have muddled through the SQL Server by deficient coding around the inner join. As a result, their queries can take five hours to run, whereas, properly written left joins, can take only two seconds to run.

Aggregation
Grouping results comes up in SQL a lot more than you might think. Knowing how to write a query when answering questions such as, “What’s the average grade for each teacher’s student list?” is invaluable. This kind of question cannot be answered with a single table or solely by joins.  You’ll often find you need to use joins in conjunction with group by statements. Always write the raw query first and then look at the results. Next, you have to figure out the best way to group them, rewrite your select clause and add a group by clause in the end.

Digging Through Data
I find this is the most lacking skill in many programmers. In fact, many otherwise-talented programmers holding Master’s Degrees fail to get jobs because they couldn’t analyze rows of data objectively during interviews. It’s just something that’s not taught but is crucial to get under you belt. Why? Eventually, some query is not going to perform as you may expect. And, the only way to find discrepancies is to look at rows of data, identify what join isn’t finding a match or where bad data is throwing things into chaos. Get familiar with how joins actually work, even if you have to manually walk through the logic of a large stored procedure’s tree of joins. It’s boring and time-consuming but absolutely necessary.


Take the time to master the core skills that will make you a successful SQL Programmer and avoid queries that run for five hours!

Recently, I asked my friend, Ray, to list those he believes are the top 10 most forward thinkers in the IT industry.  Below is the list he generated. 

Like most smart people, Ray gets his information from institutions such as the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Huffington Post, Ted Talks ...  Ray is not an IT expert; he is, however, a marketer: the type that has an opinion on everything and is all too willing to share it.  Unfortunately, many of his opinions are based upon the writings/editorials of those attempting to appeal to the reading level of an 8th grader.  I suppose it could be worse.  He could be referencing Yahoo News, where important stories get priority placement such as when the voluptuous Kate Upton holds a computer close to her breasts.

Before you read further, note that missing from this list and not credited are innovators: Bill Joy, Dennis Ritchie, Linus Torvalds, Alan Turing, Edward Howard Armstrong, Peter Andreas Grunberg and Albert Fent, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz/Hermann Grassmann ... You know the type:  the type of individual who burns the midnight oil and rarely, if ever, guffaws over their discoveries or achievements.

Tech Life in Michigan

Home of the Ford Motor Company and many other Fortune 500 and Fortune 1000 Companies, Michigan has a list of famous people that have made their mark on society. Famous Michiganians: Francis Ford Coppola film director; Henry Ford industrialist, Earvin Magic Johnson basketball player; Charles A. Lindbergh aviator; Madonna singer; Stevie Wonder singer; John T. Parsons inventor and William R. Hewlett inventor.
It is nothing for one to know something unless another knows you know it. ~Persian Proverb
other Learning Options
Software developers near Pontiac have ample opportunities to meet like minded techie individuals, collaborate and expend their career choices by participating in Meet-Up Groups. The following is a list of Technology Groups in the area.
Fortune 500 and 1000 companies in Michigan that offer opportunities for Google for Business developers
Company Name City Industry Secondary Industry
Lear Corporation Southfield Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
TRW Automotive Holdings Corp. Livonia Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
Spartan Stores, Inc. Byron Center Retail Grocery and Specialty Food Stores
Steelcase Inc. Grand Rapids Manufacturing Furniture Manufacturing
Valassis Communications, Inc. Livonia Business Services Advertising, Marketing and PR
Autoliv, Inc. Auburn Hills Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
Cooper-Standard Automotive Group Novi Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
Penske Automotive Group, Inc. Bloomfield Hills Retail Automobile Dealers
Con-Way Inc. Ann Arbor Transportation and Storage Freight Hauling (Rail and Truck)
Meritor, Inc. Troy Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
Visteon Corporation Van Buren Twp Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
Affinia Group, Inc. Ann Arbor Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
Perrigo Company Allegan Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Pharmaceuticals
BorgWarner Inc. Auburn Hills Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
Auto-Owners Insurance Lansing Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
DTE Energy Company Detroit Energy and Utilities Gas and Electric Utilities
Whirlpool Corporation Benton Harbor Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
Herman Miller, Inc. Zeeland Manufacturing Furniture Manufacturing
Universal Forest Products Grand Rapids Manufacturing Furniture Manufacturing
Masco Corporation Inc. Taylor Manufacturing Concrete, Glass, and Building Materials
PULTEGROUP, INC. Bloomfield Hills Real Estate and Construction Real Estate & Construction Other
CMS Energy Corporation Jackson Energy and Utilities Energy and Utilities Other
Stryker Corporation Portage Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Medical Devices
General Motors Company (GM) Detroit Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
Kellogg Company Battle Creek Manufacturing Food and Dairy Product Manufacturing and Packaging
The Dow Chemical Company Midland Manufacturing Chemicals and Petrochemicals
Kelly Services, Inc. Troy Business Services HR and Recruiting Services
Ford Motor Company Dearborn Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles

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A successful career as a software developer or other IT professional requires a solid understanding of software development processes, design patterns, enterprise application architectures, web services, security, networking and much more. The progression from novice to expert can be a daunting endeavor; this is especially true when traversing the learning curve without expert guidance. A common experience is that too much time and money is wasted on a career plan or application due to misinformation.

The Hartmann Software Group understands these issues and addresses them and others during any training engagement. Although no IT educational institution can guarantee career or application development success, HSG can get you closer to your goals at a far faster rate than self paced learning and, arguably, than the competition. Here are the reasons why we are so successful at teaching:

  • Learn from the experts.
    1. We have provided software development and other IT related training to many major corporations in Michigan since 2002.
    2. Our educators have years of consulting and training experience; moreover, we require each trainer to have cross-discipline expertise i.e. be Java and .NET experts so that you get a broad understanding of how industry wide experts work and think.
  • Discover tips and tricks about Google for Business programming
  • Get your questions answered by easy to follow, organized Google for Business experts
  • Get up to speed with vital Google for Business programming tools
  • Save on travel expenses by learning right from your desk or home office. Enroll in an online instructor led class. Nearly all of our classes are offered in this way.
  • Prepare to hit the ground running for a new job or a new position
  • See the big picture and have the instructor fill in the gaps
  • We teach with sophisticated learning tools and provide excellent supporting course material
  • Books and course material are provided in advance
  • Get a book of your choice from the HSG Store as a gift from us when you register for a class
  • Gain a lot of practical skills in a short amount of time
  • We teach what we know…software
  • We care…
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Interesting Reads Take a class with us and receive a book of your choosing for 50% off MSRP.