C# Programming Training Classes in Hamilton, Ohio

Learn C# Programming in Hamilton, Ohio and surrounding areas via our hands-on, expert led courses. All of our classes either are offered on an onsite, online or public instructor led basis. Here is a list of our current C# Programming related training offerings in Hamilton, Ohio: C# Programming Training

We offer private customized training for groups of 3 or more attendees.
Hamilton  Upcoming Instructor Led Online and Public C# Programming Training Classes
20483: Programming in C# Training/Class 5 December, 2022 - 9 December, 2022 $2090
HSG Training Center
Hamilton, Ohio
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
Object-Oriented Programming in C# Training/Class 5 December, 2022 - 9 December, 2022 $2090
HSG Training Center
Hamilton, Ohio
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
ASP.NET Core MVC - VS2019/Core 5.0 Training/Class 29 August, 2022 - 30 August, 2022 $890
HSG Training Center
Hamilton, Ohio
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration

C# Programming Training Catalog

cost: $ 2090length: 5 day(s)
cost: $ 1190length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 790length: 2 day(s)
cost: $ 1090length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 990length: 2 day(s)

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Companies have been collecting and analyzing data forever, pretty much.” So what’s really new here? What’s driving the data-analytics revolution and what does it mean for those that choose to postpone or ignore the pivotal role big-data is currently having on productivity and competition globally?

General Electric chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt explains it best when stating that “industrial companies are now in the information business—whether they like it or not.”  Likewise, digital data is now everywhere, it’s in every industry, in every economy, in every organization and according to the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), this topic might once have concerned only a few data geeks, but big data is now relevant for leaders across every sector as well as consumers of products and services.

In light of the new data-driven global landscape and rapid technological advances, the question for senior leaders in companies now is how to integrate new capabilities into their operations and strategies—and position themselves globally where analytics can influence entire industries. An interesting discussion with six of theses senior leaders is covered in MGI’s article, “How companies are using big data and analytics,” providing us with a glimpse into a real-time decision making processes.

 

No industry is as global as software development.  Pervasive networking means that software developers can, and do, work from anywhere. This has led many businesses to hiring development subcontractors in other countries, aiming to find good development talent at lower prices, or with fewer hassles on entry into the US.

While this is an ongoing and dynamic equilibrium, there are compelling reasons for doing software development in the United States, or using a hybrid model where some parts of the task are parceled out to foreign contractors and some are handled locally.

Development Methodologies

The primary reason for developing software overseas is cost reduction. The primary argument against overseas software development is slower development cycles. When software still used the "waterfall" industrial process for project management (where everything is budgeted in terms of time at the beginning of the project), offshoring was quite compelling. As more companies emulate Google and Facebook's process of "release early, update often, and refine from user feedback," an increasing premium has been put on software teams that are small enough to be agile (indeed, the development process is called Agile Development), and centralized enough, in terms of time zones, that collaborators can work together. This has made both Google and Facebook leaders in US-based software development, though they both still maintain teams of developers in other countries tasked with specific projects.

Localization For Americans

The United States is still one of the major markets for software development, and projects aimed at American customers needs to meet cultural norms. This applies to any country, not just the U.S. This puts a premium on software developers who aren't just fluent in English, but native speakers, and who understand American culture. While it's possible (and even likely) to make server-side software, and management utilities that can get by with terse, fractured English, anything that's enterprise-facing or consumer-facing requires more work on polish and presentation than is practical using outsourced developers. There is a reason why the leaders in software User Interface development are all US-based companies, and that's because consumer-focused design is still an overwhelming US advantage.

Ongoing Concerns

The primary concern for American software development is talent production. The US secondary education system produces a much smaller percentage of students with a solid math and engineering background, and while US universities lead the world in their computer science and engineering curricula, slightly under half of all of those graduates are from foreign countries, because American students don't take the course loads needed to succeed in them. Software development companies in the United States are deeply concerned about getting enough engineers and programmers out of the US university system. Some, such as Google, are trying to get programmers hooked on logical problem solving at a young age, with the Summer of Code programs. Others, like Microsoft, offer scholarships for computer science degrees.

Overall, the changes in project management methodologies mean that the US is the current leader in software development, and so long as the primary market for software remains English and American-centric, that's going to remain true. That trend is far from guaranteed, and in the world of software, things can change quickly.

Cloud computing is the recent rage in the IT industry. According to the report by Forbes, the estimated global market for cloud computing is expected to reach $35.6 billion in 2015, from the $12.1 billion market of 2010.

How it began

The idea of cloud computing was inspired by the concept of “utility computing” which introduced the idea of computing using the virtual servers. These virtual servers do not actually exist anywhere physically and can be moved anywhere without causing any disturbance to the end users. Thus it minimizes the cost involved on the devices to a great extent and provides innumerable benefits to the companies that adopt this system.

Cloud Computing Types

Back in the late 90's, there were a number of computer scienctists claiming to know java in hopes of landing a job for $80k+/year.  In fact, I know a woman you did just that:  land a project management position with a large telecom and have no experience whatsoever.  I guess the company figured that some talent was better than no talent and that, with some time and training, she would be productive.  Like all gravey train stories, that one, too, had an end.  After only a year, she was given a pink slip.

Not only are those days over, job prospects for the IT professional have become considerably more demanding.  Saying you know java today is like saying you know that you have expertise with the computer mouse; that's nice, but what else can you do.   This demand can be attributed to an increase in global competition along with the introduction of a number of varied technologies.   Take .NET, Python, Ruby, Spring, Hibernate ... as an example;  most of them, along with many others, are the backbone of the IT infrastructure of most mid-to-large scale US corporations.  Imagine the difficulty in finding the right mix of experience, knowledge and talent to support, maintain and devlop with such desparate technologies.

Well imagine no more.  According to the IT Hiring Index and Skills Report, seventy percent of CIO’s said it's challenging to find skilled professionals today.  If we add the rapid rate of technological innovation into the mix of factors affecting more businesses now than ever before, it’s understandable that the skill gap is widening.  Consider this as well:  the economic downturn has forced many potential retires to remain in the workforce.  This is detailed in MetLife's annual Study of Employee Benefits which states that“more than one-third of surveyed Baby Boomers (35%) say that as a result of economic conditions they plan to postpone their retirement.”  How then does the corporation hire new, more informed/better educated talent?    Indeed, the IT skills gap is ever widening.

In order to compensate for these skill discrepencies, many firms have resorted to hire the ideal candidates by demanding they possess a christmas wish list of expertise in a variety of different IT disciplines.  It would not be uncommon that such individuals have a strong programming background and are brilliant DBA's.  What about training?  That is certainly a way to diminish the skills gap.

Tech Life in Ohio

Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, Benjamin Harrison, William McKinley, William H. Taft, and Warren G. Harding, were all U.S. Presidents born in Ohio. The first recognized university in Ohio was Ohio University founded in 1804. It wasn?t long until the first interracial and coeducational college in the United States, Oberlin, was founded in 1833. The Buckeye State produced some interesting discoveries such as: Charles Goodyear discovering the process of vulcanizing rubber in 1839; Roy J. Plunkett inventing Teflon in 1938; and Charles Kettering inventing the automobile self-starter in 1911.
Would a dating service on the net be ?frowned upon' . . . ? I hope not. But even if it is, don't let that stop you from notifying me via net mail if you start one. Richard Stallman, founder of the free Software movement, 1978 quote in regards to the first spam email sent by DEC salesman, Gary Thuerk.
other Learning Options
Software developers near Hamilton have ample opportunities to meet like minded techie individuals, collaborate and expend their career choices by participating in Meet-Up Groups. The following is a list of Technology Groups in the area.
Fortune 500 and 1000 companies in Ohio that offer opportunities for C# Programming developers
Company Name City Industry Secondary Industry
Nationwide Insurance Company Columbus Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Owens Corning Toledo Manufacturing Concrete, Glass, and Building Materials
FirstEnergy Corp Akron Energy and Utilities Gas and Electric Utilities
The Lubrizol Corporation Wickliffe Manufacturing Chemicals and Petrochemicals
Sherwin-Williams Cleveland Retail Hardware and Building Material Dealers
Key Bank Cleveland Financial Services Banks
TravelCenters of America, Inc. Westlake Retail Gasoline Stations
Dana Holding Company Maumee Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
O-I (Owens Illinois), Inc. Perrysburg Manufacturing Concrete, Glass, and Building Materials
Big Lots Stores, Inc. Columbus Retail Department Stores
Limited Brands, Inc. Columbus Retail Clothing and Shoes Stores
Cardinal Health Dublin Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotech Other
Progressive Corporation Cleveland Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Parker Hannifin Corporation Cleveland Manufacturing Manufacturing Other
American Financial Group, Inc. Cincinnati Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
American Electric Power Company, Inc Columbus Energy and Utilities Gas and Electric Utilities
Fifth Third Bancorp Cincinnati Financial Services Banks
Macy's, Inc. Cincinnati Retail Department Stores
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. Akron Manufacturing Plastics and Rubber Manufacturing
The Kroger Co. Cincinnati Retail Grocery and Specialty Food Stores
Omnicare, Inc. Cincinnati Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Pharmaceuticals
The Procter and Gamble Company Cincinnati Consumer Services Personal Care

training details locations, tags and why hsg

A successful career as a software developer or other IT professional requires a solid understanding of software development processes, design patterns, enterprise application architectures, web services, security, networking and much more. The progression from novice to expert can be a daunting endeavor; this is especially true when traversing the learning curve without expert guidance. A common experience is that too much time and money is wasted on a career plan or application due to misinformation.

The Hartmann Software Group understands these issues and addresses them and others during any training engagement. Although no IT educational institution can guarantee career or application development success, HSG can get you closer to your goals at a far faster rate than self paced learning and, arguably, than the competition. Here are the reasons why we are so successful at teaching:

  • Learn from the experts.
    1. We have provided software development and other IT related training to many major corporations in Ohio since 2002.
    2. Our educators have years of consulting and training experience; moreover, we require each trainer to have cross-discipline expertise i.e. be Java and .NET experts so that you get a broad understanding of how industry wide experts work and think.
  • Discover tips and tricks about C# Programming programming
  • Get your questions answered by easy to follow, organized C# Programming experts
  • Get up to speed with vital C# Programming programming tools
  • Save on travel expenses by learning right from your desk or home office. Enroll in an online instructor led class. Nearly all of our classes are offered in this way.
  • Prepare to hit the ground running for a new job or a new position
  • See the big picture and have the instructor fill in the gaps
  • We teach with sophisticated learning tools and provide excellent supporting course material
  • Books and course material are provided in advance
  • Get a book of your choice from the HSG Store as a gift from us when you register for a class
  • Gain a lot of practical skills in a short amount of time
  • We teach what we know…software
  • We care…
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Interesting Reads Take a class with us and receive a book of your choosing for 50% off MSRP.