.NET Training Classes in Madison, Wisconsin

Learn .NET in Madison, Wisconsin and surrounding areas via our hands-on, expert led courses. All of our classes either are offered on an onsite, online or public instructor led basis. Here is a list of our current .NET related training offerings in Madison, Wisconsin: .NET Training

We offer private customized training for groups of 3 or more attendees.
Madison  Upcoming Instructor Led Online and Public .NET Training Classes
Object-Oriented Programming in C# Training/Class 22 June, 2020 - 26 June, 2020 $2090
HSG Training Center
Madison, Wisconsin
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
ASP.NET MVC 5 Using C# Training/Class 27 July, 2020 - 29 July, 2020 $1390
HSG Training Center
Madison, Wisconsin
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
.NET Framework Using C# Training/Class 13 July, 2020 - 16 July, 2020 $1890
HSG Training Center
Madison, Wisconsin
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
ASP.NET Core MVC Training/Class 27 July, 2020 - 28 July, 2020 $790
HSG Training Center
Madison, Wisconsin
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration

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.NET Training Catalog

cost: $ 1190length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 1590length: 4 day(s)
cost: $ 1190length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 2090length: 4 day(s)

C# Programming Classes

cost: $ 790length: 2 day(s)
cost: $ 990length: 2 day(s)

Design Patterns Classes

F# Programming Classes

JUnit, TDD, CPTC, Web Penetration Classes

Microsoft Development Classes

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Gain insight and ideas from students with different perspectives and experiences.

Blog Entries publications that: entertain, make you think, offer insight

Last year, Hewlett-Packard purchased Autonomy for $10 billion, enduring a number of arrows from its competitor Oracle. What a difference a year is!

 

Since the purchase HP saw the leaving of Autonomy CEO Mike Lynch, which was not on friendly terms. It also saw the departure of the whole original management team and 20 percent of the staff. Now, the question is whether or not HP will see its move compensate or become another WebOS-style fiasco, marking the company needs to stay with hardware.

 

As part of our Java Tutorial series, listed here are all the files you need in order to create a java socket message application.

  1. Java Server Tutorial
  2. Java Client Tutorial
  3. readme - Java Socket Messaging Information
  4. Java Socket Tutorial Download

The original article was posted by Michael Veksler on Quora

A very well known fact is that code is written once, but it is read many times. This means that a good developer, in any language, writes understandable code. Writing understandable code is not always easy, and takes practice. The difficult part, is that you read what you have just written and it makes perfect sense to you, but a year later you curse the idiot who wrote that code, without realizing it was you.

The best way to learn how to write readable code, is to collaborate with others. Other people will spot badly written code, faster than the author. There are plenty of open source projects, which you can start working on and learn from more experienced programmers.

Readability is a tricky thing, and involves several aspects:

  1. Never surprise the reader of your code, even if it will be you a year from now. For example, don’t call a function max() when sometimes it returns the minimum().
  2. Be consistent, and use the same conventions throughout your code. Not only the same naming conventions, and the same indentation, but also the same semantics. If, for example, most of your functions return a negative value for failure and a positive for success, then avoid writing functions that return false on failure.
  3. Write short functions, so that they fit your screen. I hate strict rules, since there are always exceptions, but from my experience you can almost always write functions short enough to fit your screen. Throughout my carrier I had only a few cases when writing short function was either impossible, or resulted in much worse code.
  4. Use descriptive names, unless this is one of those standard names, such as i or it in a loop. Don’t make the name too long, on one hand, but don’t make it cryptic on the other.
  5. Define function names by what they do, not by what they are used for or how they are implemented. If you name functions by what they do, then code will be much more readable, and much more reusable.
  6. Avoid global state as much as you can. Global variables, and sometimes attributes in an object, are difficult to reason about. It is difficult to understand why such global state changes, when it does, and requires a lot of debugging.
  7. As Donald Knuth wrote in one of his papers: “Early optimization is the root of all evil”. Meaning, write for readability first, optimize later.
  8. The opposite of the previous rule: if you have an alternative which has similar readability, but lower complexity, use it. Also, if you have a polynomial alternative to your exponential algorithm (when N > 10), you should use that.

Use standard library whenever it makes your code shorter; don’t implement everything yourself. External libraries are more problematic, and are both good and bad. With external libraries, such as boost, you can save a lot of work. You should really learn boost, with the added benefit that the c++ standard gets more and more form boost. The negative with boost is that it changes over time, and code that works today may break tomorrow. Also, if you try to combine a third-party library, which uses a specific version of boost, it may break with your current version of boost. This does not happen often, but it may.

Don’t blindly use C++ standard library without understanding what it does - learn it. You look at std::vector::push_back() documentation at it tells you that its complexity is O(1), amortized. What does that mean? How does it work? What are benefits and what are the costs? Same with std::map, and with std::unordered_map. Knowing the difference between these two maps, you’d know when to use each one of them.

Never call new or delete directly, use std::make_unique and [cost c++]std::make_shared[/code] instead. Try to implement usique_ptr, shared_ptr, weak_ptr yourself, in order to understand what they actually do. People do dumb things with these types, since they don’t understand what these pointers are.

Every time you look at a new class or function, in boost or in std, ask yourself “why is it done this way and not another?”. It will help you understand trade-offs in software development, and will help you use the right tool for your job. Don’t be afraid to peek into the source of boost and the std, and try to understand how it works. It will not be easy, at first, but you will learn a lot.

Know what complexity is, and how to calculate it. Avoid exponential and cubic complexity, unless you know your N is very low, and will always stay low.

Learn data-structures and algorithms, and know them. Many people think that it is simply a wasted time, since all data-structures are implemented in standard libraries, but this is not as simple as that. By understanding data-structures, you’d find it easier to pick the right library. Also, believe it or now, after 25 years since I learned data-structures, I still use this knowledge. Half a year ago I had to implemented a hash table, since I needed fast serialization capability which the available libraries did not provide. Now I am writing some sort of interval-btree, since using std::map, for the same purpose, turned up to be very very slow, and the performance bottleneck of my code.

Notice that you can’t just find interval-btree on Wikipedia, or stack-overflow. The closest thing you can find is Interval tree, but it has some performance drawbacks. So how can you implement an interval-btree, unless you know what a btree is and what an interval-tree is? I strongly suggest, again, that you learn and remember data-structures.

These are the most important things, which will make you a better programmer. The other things will follow.

Is it possible for anyone to give Microsoft a fair trial? The first half of 2012 is in the history books. Yet the firm still cannot seem to shake the public opinion as The Evil Empire that produces crap code.

I am in a unique position. I joined the orbit of Microsoft in 1973 after the Army decided it didn't need photographers flying around in helicopters in Vietnam anymore. I was sent to Fort Lewis and assigned to 9th Finance because I had a smattering of knowledge about computers. And the Army was going to a computerized payroll system.

Bill and Paul used the University of Washington's VAX PDP computer to create BASIC for the Altair computer. Certainly laughable by today's standards, it is the very roots of the home computer.

Microsoft became successful because it delivered what people wanted.

Tech Life in Wisconsin

Fun Facts and stats: ? Wisconsin?s nickname is the Badger State. ? In 1882 the first hydroelectric plant in the United States was built at Fox River. ? The first practical typewriter was designed in Milwaukee in 1867. ? The nation's first kindergarten was established in Watertown in 1856. Its first students were local German-speaking youngsters. ? The Republican Party was founded in Ripon in 1854.
Java is C++ without the guns, knives, and clubs.James Gosling, co-inventor of Java
other Learning Options
Software developers near Madison have ample opportunities to meet like minded techie individuals, collaborate and expend their career choices by participating in Meet-Up Groups. The following is a list of Technology Groups in the area.
Fortune 500 and 1000 companies in Wisconsin that offer opportunities for .NET developers
Company Name City Industry Secondary Industry
We Energies Milwaukee Energy and Utilities Gas and Electric Utilities
Bemis Company, Inc. Neenah Manufacturing Plastics and Rubber Manufacturing
Regal Beloit Corporation Beloit Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
Manitowoc Company, Inc Manitowoc Manufacturing Heavy Machinery
Briggs and Stratton Corporation Milwaukee Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
Mortgage Guaranty Insurance Corporation (MGIC) Milwaukee Financial Services Lending and Mortgage
A.O. Smith Corporation Milwaukee Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
Sentry Insurance Stevens Point Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Rockwell Automation, Inc. Milwaukee Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
Bucyrus International, Inc. South Milwaukee Manufacturing Heavy Machinery
Diversey, Inc. Sturtevant Manufacturing Chemicals and Petrochemicals
Alliant Energy Corporation Madison Energy and Utilities Gas and Electric Utilities
Plexus Corp. Neenah Manufacturing Manufacturing Other
Spectrum Brands Holdings, Inc. Madison Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
Kohl's Corporation Menomonee Falls Retail Department Stores
Snap-on Tools, Inc. Kenosha Manufacturing Tools, Hardware and Light Machinery
Fiserv, Inc. Brookfield Software and Internet Data Analytics, Management and Storage
CUNA Mutual Group Madison Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Oshkosh Corporation Oshkosh Manufacturing Heavy Machinery
Modine Manufacturing Company Racine Manufacturing Manufacturing Other
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company Milwaukee Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Joy Global Inc. Milwaukee Manufacturing Heavy Machinery
Harley-Davidson, Inc. Milwaukee Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
American Family Insurance Madison Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Johnson Controls, Inc. Milwaukee Manufacturing Heavy Machinery
ManpowerGroup Milwaukee Business Services HR and Recruiting Services

training details locations, tags and why hsg

the hartmann software group advantage
A successful career as a software developer or other IT professional requires a solid understanding of software development processes, design patterns, enterprise application architectures, web services, security, networking and much more. The progression from novice to expert can be a daunting endeavor; this is especially true when traversing the learning curve without expert guidance. A common experience is that too much time and money is wasted on a career plan or application due to misinformation.

The Hartmann Software Group understands these issues and addresses them and others during any training engagement. Although no IT educational institution can guarantee career or application development success, HSG can get you closer to your goals at a far faster rate than self paced learning and, arguably, than the competition. Here are the reasons why we are so successful at teaching:

  • Learn from the experts.
    1. We have provided software development and other IT related training to many major corporations in Wisconsin since 2002.
    2. Our educators have years of consulting and training experience; moreover, we require each trainer to have cross-discipline expertise i.e. be Java and .NET experts so that you get a broad understanding of how industry wide experts work and think.
  • Discover tips and tricks about .NET programming
  • Get your questions answered by easy to follow, organized .NET experts
  • Get up to speed with vital .NET programming tools
  • Save on travel expenses by learning right from your desk or home office. Enroll in an online instructor led class. Nearly all of our classes are offered in this way.
  • Prepare to hit the ground running for a new job or a new position
  • See the big picture and have the instructor fill in the gaps
  • We teach with sophisticated learning tools and provide excellent supporting course material
  • Books and course material are provided in advance
  • Get a book of your choice from the HSG Store as a gift from us when you register for a class
  • Gain a lot of practical skills in a short amount of time
  • We teach what we know…software
  • We care…
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Interesting Reads Take a class with us and receive a book of your choosing for 50% off MSRP.