.NET Training Classes in Nashville, Tennessee

Learn .NET in Nashville, Tennessee and surrounding areas via our hands-on, expert led courses. All of our classes either are offered on an onsite, online or public instructor led basis. Here is a list of our current .NET related training offerings in Nashville, Tennessee: .NET Training

We offer private customized training for groups of 3 or more attendees.
Nashville  Upcoming Instructor Led Online and Public .NET Training Classes
.NET Framework Using C# Training/Class 20 January, 2020 - 23 January, 2020 $1890
HSG Training Center
Nashville, Tennessee
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
ASP.NET MVC 5 Using C# Training/Class 16 December, 2019 - 18 December, 2019 $1390
HSG Training Center
Nashville, Tennessee
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
ASP.NET Core MVC Training/Class 16 December, 2019 - 17 December, 2019 $790
HSG Training Center
Nashville, Tennessee
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
Object-Oriented Programming in C# Training/Class 16 March, 2020 - 20 March, 2020 $2090
HSG Training Center
Nashville, Tennessee
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
MCSA: WINDOWS SERVER 2016 BOOT CAMP Training/Class 16 December, 2019 - 24 December, 2019 $3200
HSG Training Center
Nashville, Tennessee
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
10961:Automating Administration with Windows PowerShell Training/Class 9 December, 2019 - 13 December, 2019 $2090
HSG Training Center
Nashville, Tennessee
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
MICROSOFT 365 CERTIFIED FUNDAMENTALS Training/Class 2 March, 2020 - 2 March, 2020 $890
HSG Training Center
Nashville, Tennessee
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration

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Gain insight and ideas from students with different perspectives and experiences.

Blog Entries publications that: entertain, make you think, offer insight

Studying a functional programming language is a good way to discover new approaches to problems and different ways of thinking. Although functional programming has much in common with logic and imperative programming, it uses unique abstractions and a different toolset for solving problems. Likewise, many current mainstream languages are beginning to pick up and integrate various techniques and features from functional programming.

Many authorities feel that Haskell is a great introductory language for learning functional programming. However, there are various other possibilities, including Scheme, F#, Scala, Clojure, Erlang and others.

Haskell is widely recognized as a beautiful, concise and high-performing programming language. It is statically typed and supports various cool features that augment language expressivity, including currying and pattern matching. In addition to monads, the language support a type-class system based on methods; this enables higher encapsulation and abstraction. Advanced Haskell will require learning about combinators, lambda calculus and category theory. Haskell allows programmers to create extremely elegant solutions.

Scheme is another good learning language -- it has an extensive history in academia and a vast body of instructional documents. Based on the oldest functional language -- Lisp -- Scheme is actually very small and elegant. Studying Scheme will allow the programmer to master iteration and recursion, lambda functions and first-class functions, closures, and bottom-up design.

Supported by Microsoft and growing in popularity, F# is a multi-paradigm, functional-first programming language that derives from ML and incorporates features from numerous languages, including OCaml, Scala, Haskell and Erlang. F# is described as a functional language that also supports object-oriented and imperative techniques. It is a .NET family member. F# allows the programmer to create succinct, type-safe, expressive and efficient solutions. It excels at parallel I/O and parallel CPU programming, data-oriented programming, and algorithmic development.

Scala is a general-purpose programming and scripting language that is both functional and object-oriented. It has strong static types and supports numerous functional language techniques such as pattern matching, lazy evaluation, currying, algebraic types, immutability and tail recursion. Scala -- from "scalable language" -- enables coders to write extremely concise source code. The code is compiled into Java bytecode and executes on the ubiquitous JVM (Java virtual machine).

Like Scala, Clojure also runs on the Java virtual machine. Because it is based on Lisp, it treats code like data and supports macros. Clojure's immutability features and time-progression constructs enable the creation of robust multithreaded programs.

Erlang is a highly concurrent language and runtime. Initially created by Ericsson to enable real-time, fault-tolerant, distributed applications, Erlang code can be altered without halting the system. The language has a functional subset with single assignment, dynamic typing, and eager evaluation. Erlang has powerful explicit support for concurrent processes.

 

Computer Programming as a Career?

What little habits make you a better software engineer?

I remember the day like it was yesterday. Pac Man had finally arrived on the Atari 2600.  It was a clear and sunny day, but it was slightly brisk. My dad drove us down to the video store about three miles from our Michigan house. If I remember correctly, the price for the game was $24.99.  It was quite expensive for the day, probably equaling a $70 game in today’s market, but it was mine. There *was* no question about it. If you purchase a game, it’s your game… right?

You couldn’t be more wrong.  With all the licensing agreements in games today, you only purchase the right to play it. You don’t actually “own” the game. 

Today, game designers want total control over the money that comes in for a game. They add in clauses that keep the game from being resold, rented, borrowed, copied, etc. All of the content in the game, including the items you find that are specifically for you, are owned by the software developer. Why, you ask, do they do this? It’s all about the money.

This need for greed started years ago, when people started modifying current games on the market. One of the first games like this was Doom. There were so many third part mods made, but because of licensing agreement, none of these versions were available for resale. The end user, or you, had to purchase Doom before they could even install the mod.  None of these “modders” were allowed to make any money off their creation.

Businesses “Going Green” is so commonplace now it’s more than just an encouraging a trend; it’s become expected of companies big and small. In fact, consumers frequently place more of an obligation on companies to go green than they do themselves. The last few years—the infancy of what may turn out to be a green revolution—have really proven that there are many ways to go green, and that some of these ways are much more financially sound than others. But rather than providing a cut and dry list of green options and their pros and cons, I’d like to take a look at the bigger picture incentives for businesses going green and how consumers are responding.

 

What does it mean to be green?

 

Big data is now in an incredibly important part of how many major businesses function. Data analysis, or the finding of facts from large volumes of data, helps businesses make many of their important decisions. Companies that conduct business on a national or international scale rely on big data in order to plot the general direction of their business. The concept of big data can be very confusing due to the sheer scale of information involved.  By following a few simple guidelines, even the layman can understand big data and its impacts on everyday life.

What Exactly is Big Data?

Just about everyone can understand the concept of data. Data is information, and information is everywhere in the modern world. Anytime you use any piece of technology you are making use of data. Anytime you read a book, skim the newspaper or listen to music you are also making use of data. Your brain interprets and organizes data constantly from your senses and your thoughts.

Big data, much like its name infers, simply describes this same data on a large sale. The internet allowed the streaming, sharing and collecting of data on a scale never before imaginable and storage technology has allowed ever increasing hoards of data to be accumulated. In order for something to be considered “big data” it must be at least 10 terabytes or more of information. To put that in perspective, consider that 10 terabytes represents the entire printed collection of material in the Library of Congress. What’s even more remarkable is that many businesses work with far more than the minimum 10 terabytes of data. UPS stores over 16 petabytes of data about its packages and customers. That’s 16,000 terabytes or the equivalent to 1,600 printed libraries of congress. The sheer amount of that data is nearly impossible for a human to comprehend, and analysis of this data is only possible with computers.

How do Big Data Companies Emerge?

All of this information comes from everywhere on the internet. The majority of the useful data includes customer information, search engine logs, and entries on social media networks to name a few. This data is constantly generated by the internet at insane rates. Specified computers and software programs are created and operated by big data companies that collect and sort this information. These programs and hardware are so sophisticated and so specialized that entire companies can be dedicated to analyzing this data and then selling it to other companies. The raw data is distilled down into manageable reports that company executives can make use of when handling business decisions.

The Top Five:

These are the five biggest companies, according to Forbes, in the business of selling either raw data reports or analytics programs that help companies to compile their own reports.

1. Splunk
Splunk is currently valued at $186 million.  It is essentially a program service that allows companies to turn their own raw data collections into usable information.

2. Opera Solutions
Opera Solutions is valued at $118 million. It serves as a data science service that helps other companies to manage the raw data that pertains to them. They can offer either direct consultation or cloud-based service.

3. Mu Sigma
Mu Sigma is valued at $114 million.  It is a slightly smaller version of Opera Solutions, offering essentially the same types of services.

4. Palantir
Palantir is valued at $78 million.  It offers data analysis software to companies so they can manage their own raw data analysis.

5. Cloudera
Cloudera is valued at $61 million.  It offers services, software and training specifically related to the Apahce Hadoop-based programs.

The software and services provided by these companies impact nearly all major businesses, industries and products. They impact what business offer, where they offer them and how they advertise them to consumers. Every advertisement, new store opening or creation of a new product is at least somewhat related to big data analysis. It is the directional force of modern business.

Sources:
http://www.sas.com/en_us/insights/big-data/what-is-big-data.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/gilpress/2013/02/22/top-ten-big-data-pure-plays/

http://www.whatsabyte.com/

 

Related:

How does Google use Python?

Top Innovative Open Source Projects Making Waves in The Technology World

Is the U.S. the Leading Software Development Country?

How to Keep On Top Of the Latest Trends in Information Technology

Tech Life in Tennessee

Tennessee has played an important role in the development of many forms of American popular music. Bristol is known as the birthplace of country music while Memphis is considered by many to be the birthplace of the blues. Tennessee is a right to work state, as are most of its Southern neighbors. Major corporations with headquarters in Tennessee include FedEx Corporation, AutoZone Incorporated and International Paper
When you set goals, something inside of you starts saying, Let's go, let's go, and ceilings start to move up. Zig Ziglar
other Learning Options
Software developers near Nashville have ample opportunities to meet like minded techie individuals, collaborate and expend their career choices by participating in Meet-Up Groups. The following is a list of Technology Groups in the area.
Fortune 500 and 1000 companies in Tennessee that offer opportunities for .NET developers
Company Name City Industry Secondary Industry
First Horizon National Corporation Memphis Financial Services Lending and Mortgage
Vanguard Health Systems, Inc. Nashville Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Hospitals
The ServiceMaster Company Memphis Consumer Services Consumer Services Other
Eastman Chemical Company Kingsport Manufacturing Chemicals and Petrochemicals
Brookdale Senior Living, Inc. Brentwood Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Residential and Long-Term Care Facilities
Scripps Networks Interactive Knoxville Media and Entertainment Radio and Television Broadcasting
Dollar General Corporation Goodlettsville Retail Retail Other
IASIS Healthcare Corporation Franklin Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Hospitals
Thomas and Betts Corporation Memphis Energy and Utilities Gas and Electric Utilities
Tractor Supply Company, Inc. Brentwood Retail Clothing and Shoes Stores
TeamHealth, Inc. Knoxville Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Doctors and Health Care Practitioners
UNIVERSITY HEALTH SYSTEM, INC. Knoxville Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Hospitals
Corrections Corporation of America Nashville Business Services Security Services
AutoZone, Inc. Memphis Retail Automobile Parts Stores
Mueller Industries, Inc. Memphis Manufacturing Metals Manufacturing
UNUM Group Chattanooga Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Fred's, Inc. Memphis Retail Grocery and Specialty Food Stores
International Paper Company Memphis Manufacturing Paper and Paper Products
Regal Entertainment Group Knoxville Media and Entertainment Motion Picture and Recording Producers
Genesco Inc. Nashville Wholesale and Distribution Apparel Wholesalers
Cracker Barrel Old Country Store, Inc. Lebanon Retail Restaurants and Bars
Lifepoint Hospitals Inc. Brentwood Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Hospitals
FedEx Corporation Memphis Transportation and Storage Postal, Express Delivery, and Couriers
Community Health Systems Franklin Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Hospitals
HCA Holdings, Inc. Nashville Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Hospitals
HealthSpring Inc. Franklin Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotech Other

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the hartmann software group advantage
A successful career as a software developer or other IT professional requires a solid understanding of software development processes, design patterns, enterprise application architectures, web services, security, networking and much more. The progression from novice to expert can be a daunting endeavor; this is especially true when traversing the learning curve without expert guidance. A common experience is that too much time and money is wasted on a career plan or application due to misinformation.

The Hartmann Software Group understands these issues and addresses them and others during any training engagement. Although no IT educational institution can guarantee career or application development success, HSG can get you closer to your goals at a far faster rate than self paced learning and, arguably, than the competition. Here are the reasons why we are so successful at teaching:

  • Learn from the experts.
    1. We have provided software development and other IT related training to many major corporations in Tennessee since 2002.
    2. Our educators have years of consulting and training experience; moreover, we require each trainer to have cross-discipline expertise i.e. be Java and .NET experts so that you get a broad understanding of how industry wide experts work and think.
  • Discover tips and tricks about .NET programming
  • Get your questions answered by easy to follow, organized .NET experts
  • Get up to speed with vital .NET programming tools
  • Save on travel expenses by learning right from your desk or home office. Enroll in an online instructor led class. Nearly all of our classes are offered in this way.
  • Prepare to hit the ground running for a new job or a new position
  • See the big picture and have the instructor fill in the gaps
  • We teach with sophisticated learning tools and provide excellent supporting course material
  • Books and course material are provided in advance
  • Get a book of your choice from the HSG Store as a gift from us when you register for a class
  • Gain a lot of practical skills in a short amount of time
  • We teach what we know…software
  • We care…
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