Linux Unix Training Classes in Nashua, New Hampshire

Learn Linux Unix in Nashua, NewHampshire and surrounding areas via our hands-on, expert led courses. All of our classes either are offered on an onsite, online or public instructor led basis. Here is a list of our current Linux Unix related training offerings in Nashua, New Hampshire: Linux Unix Training

We offer private customized training for groups of 3 or more attendees.
Nashua  Upcoming Instructor Led Online and Public Linux Unix Training Classes
Developing Embedded Linux Device Drivers (LFD435) Training/Class 24 February, 2020 - 27 February, 2020 $2800
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
Embedded Linux Development with Yocto Project (LFD460) Training/Class 17 February, 2020 - 20 February, 2020 $2800
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
Enterprise Linux System Administration Training/Class 9 March, 2020 - 13 March, 2020 $2190
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
LINUX PERFORMANCE TUNING AND ANALYSIS Training/Class 1 June, 2020 - 4 June, 2020 $2490
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
LINUX SHELL SCRIPTING Training/Class 28 May, 2020 - 29 May, 2020 $990
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
Linux Troubleshooting Training/Class 2 March, 2020 - 6 March, 2020 $2290
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
Docker Training/Class 19 February, 2020 - 21 February, 2020 $1690
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
ENTERPRISE LINUX HIGH AVAILABILITY CLUSTERING Training/Class 23 March, 2020 - 26 March, 2020 $2590
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
ANSIBLE Training/Class 3 February, 2020 - 5 February, 2020 $1990
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
DOCKER WITH KUBERNETES ADMINISTRATION Training/Class 2 March, 2020 - 6 March, 2020 $2490
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
HADOOP FOR SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATORS Training/Class 16 March, 2020 - 18 March, 2020 $1890
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration
RED HAT SATELLITE V6 (FOREMAN/KATELLO) ADMINISTRATION Training/Class 6 July, 2020 - 9 July, 2020 $2590
HSG Training Center
Nashua, New Hampshire
Hartmann Software Group Training Registration

View all Scheduled Linux Unix Training Classes

Linux Unix Training Catalog

cost: $ 1990length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 1090length: 3 day(s)
cost: $ 2090length: 5 day(s)

DevOps Classes

cost: $ 1690length: 3 day(s)

Foundations of Web Design & Web Authoring Classes

Course Directory [training on all levels]

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Gain insight and ideas from students with different perspectives and experiences.

Blog Entries publications that: entertain, make you think, offer insight

I’ll get straight to the point.  Why should companies invest more in management training?  Here are 10 simple reasons.

1) An employee’s relationship with his or her direct manager is the most important single factor in employee engagement.

2) Engaged employees are happier and more productive.  Disengaged employees are frustrated and more disruptive.

3) Because there’s no widely agreed-on skillset for management (good managers come in all shapes and sizes), there’s an assumption everyone knows how to do it.  This is akin to someone who’s never driven before being given keys to a car and told: “Drive.”  (Many many years ago, this is how I first learned to manage.  I blundered my way through it.  Trial and error.  It wasn’t pretty.)

Planning on a little spring cleaning and getting rid of all those old electronics? With the way technology changes so quickly, it seems like we no sooner have one new electronic piece and there’s a new one on the market that we absolutely have to have. The result is a ton of used electronics stored away. Now it’s time to get rid of everything, here are some tips on what to do with all that old tech stuff and how to do it safely.

Save on Landfill Waste

Few people really realize where their electronics wind up when they throw them in the trash or dumpster. They assume they’re getting taken care of and just forget about them. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, one of the fastest growing components of landfill waste is electronics. The unfortunate part of this is that these electronics are filled with lead, mercury and other toxic chemicals – chemicals that find their way into our soil and water.

This results in the contamination of our lakes, streams and soil. The best way to avoid this is by knowing where your electronics are going and to dispose of them safely. Contact the recycling center in your area and ask for the best place to dispose of your old electronics.

Think of Security

Our lives are filled with electronic technology, whether it’s in the form of computers, tablets, smart phones or video games. Most of these electronics allow network sharing with people all over the world. With identity theft such a growing concern, much of our private lives and personal information is entered in the hard drives of these items.

Before you dispose of any electronics, make sure the hard drives are wiped clean of all personal information. This requires more than just “deleting” files. If you’re not sure how to correctly get rid of the information, contact a professional to do this for you. Even if you have to pay to have it done, it’s a minimal expense compared to having your private information stolen.

Find New Homes for Your Electronics

Once you’ve cleaned out your electronics of personal information, they may still be worth something to other individuals. You may know of a child or elderly person who would really appreciate a “new” computer or a tablet. Someone who has never owned a smart phone or laptop may be thrilled to suddenly own one, even if they are obsolete to you.

If you can’t find anyone that wants them, consider selling them on places like eBay, Craigslist or one of the many other online auction sites. The old saying, “one man’s junk is another man’s gold” is especially true when it comes to electronics. Many people like building computers using their own parts.

Students in computer-related programs also utilize used electronics as a form of hands-on training. Most schools also take in donated computers, televisions and cell phones. Contact your electric company or school district to get information on where you can take your old electronics. You’ll be not only cleaning out your house but also helping the environment.

 

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Cloud Computing: What It Means and How It Could Threaten the Traditional Outsourcing Model

Studying a functional programming language is a good way to discover new approaches to problems and different ways of thinking. Although functional programming has much in common with logic and imperative programming, it uses unique abstractions and a different toolset for solving problems. Likewise, many current mainstream languages are beginning to pick up and integrate various techniques and features from functional programming.

Many authorities feel that Haskell is a great introductory language for learning functional programming. However, there are various other possibilities, including Scheme, F#, Scala, Clojure, Erlang and others.

Haskell is widely recognized as a beautiful, concise and high-performing programming language. It is statically typed and supports various cool features that augment language expressivity, including currying and pattern matching. In addition to monads, the language support a type-class system based on methods; this enables higher encapsulation and abstraction. Advanced Haskell will require learning about combinators, lambda calculus and category theory. Haskell allows programmers to create extremely elegant solutions.

Scheme is another good learning language -- it has an extensive history in academia and a vast body of instructional documents. Based on the oldest functional language -- Lisp -- Scheme is actually very small and elegant. Studying Scheme will allow the programmer to master iteration and recursion, lambda functions and first-class functions, closures, and bottom-up design.

Supported by Microsoft and growing in popularity, F# is a multi-paradigm, functional-first programming language that derives from ML and incorporates features from numerous languages, including OCaml, Scala, Haskell and Erlang. F# is described as a functional language that also supports object-oriented and imperative techniques. It is a .NET family member. F# allows the programmer to create succinct, type-safe, expressive and efficient solutions. It excels at parallel I/O and parallel CPU programming, data-oriented programming, and algorithmic development.

Scala is a general-purpose programming and scripting language that is both functional and object-oriented. It has strong static types and supports numerous functional language techniques such as pattern matching, lazy evaluation, currying, algebraic types, immutability and tail recursion. Scala -- from "scalable language" -- enables coders to write extremely concise source code. The code is compiled into Java bytecode and executes on the ubiquitous JVM (Java virtual machine).

Like Scala, Clojure also runs on the Java virtual machine. Because it is based on Lisp, it treats code like data and supports macros. Clojure's immutability features and time-progression constructs enable the creation of robust multithreaded programs.

Erlang is a highly concurrent language and runtime. Initially created by Ericsson to enable real-time, fault-tolerant, distributed applications, Erlang code can be altered without halting the system. The language has a functional subset with single assignment, dynamic typing, and eager evaluation. Erlang has powerful explicit support for concurrent processes.

 

Computer Programming as a Career?

What little habits make you a better software engineer?

The world of technology moves faster than the speed of light it seems. Devices are updated and software upgraded annually and sometimes more frequent than that.  Society wants to be able to function and be as productive as they can be as well as be entertained “now”.

Software companies must be ready to meet the demands of their loyal customers while increasing their market share among new customers. These companies are always looking to the ingenuity and creativity of their colleagues to keep them in the consumer’s focus. But, who are these “colleagues”? Are they required to be young, twenty-somethings that are fresh out of college with a host of ideas and energy about software and hardware that the consumer may enjoy? Or can they be more mature with a little more experience in the working world and may know a bit more about the consumer’s needs and some knowledge of today’s devices?

Older candidates for IT positions face many challenges when competing with their younger counterparts. The primary challenge that most will face is the ability to prove their knowledge of current hardware and the development and application of software used by consumers. Candidates will have to prove that although they may be older, their knowledge and experience is very current. They will have to make more of an effort to show that they are on pace with the younger candidates.

Another challenge will be marketing what should be considered prized assets; maturity and work experience. More mature candidates bring along a history of work experience and a level of maturity that can be utilized as a resource for most companies. They are more experienced with time management, organization and communication skills as well as balancing home and work. They can quickly become role models for younger colleagues within the company.

Unfortunately, some mature candidates can be seen as a threat to existing leadership, especially if that leadership is younger. Younger members of a leadership team may be concerned that the older candidate may be able to move them out of their position. If the candidate has a considerably robust technological background this will be a special concern and could cause the candidate to lose the opportunity.

Demonstrating that their knowledge or training is current, marketing their experience and maturity, and not being seen as a threat to existing leadership make job hunting an even more daunting task for the mature candidate. There are often times that they are overlooked for positions for these very reasons. But, software companies who know what they need and how to utilize talent will not pass up the opportunity to hire these jewels.

 

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Tech Life in New Hampshire

The first free public library in the United States was established in Peterborough in 1833. One hundred thirty years later in 1963, New Hampshire adopted the first legal lottery. Interestingly, New Hampshire's State House is the oldest state capitol in which a legislature still meets in its original chamber. Many of the 80 or so public schools today in this state serve more than one county. In 2008, New Hampshire tied with Massachusetts for the highest scores on the SAT and ACT standardized high school testing.
Nothing is more powerful than a community of talented people working on related problems. Paul Graham
other Learning Options
Software developers near Nashua have ample opportunities to meet like minded techie individuals, collaborate and expend their career choices by participating in Meet-Up Groups. The following is a list of Technology Groups in the area.

training details locations, tags and why hsg

A successful career as a software developer or other IT professional requires a solid understanding of software development processes, design patterns, enterprise application architectures, web services, security, networking and much more. The progression from novice to expert can be a daunting endeavor; this is especially true when traversing the learning curve without expert guidance. A common experience is that too much time and money is wasted on a career plan or application due to misinformation.

The Hartmann Software Group understands these issues and addresses them and others during any training engagement. Although no IT educational institution can guarantee career or application development success, HSG can get you closer to your goals at a far faster rate than self paced learning and, arguably, than the competition. Here are the reasons why we are so successful at teaching:

  • Learn from the experts.
    1. We have provided software development and other IT related training to many major corporations in New Hampshire since 2002.
    2. Our educators have years of consulting and training experience; moreover, we require each trainer to have cross-discipline expertise i.e. be Java and .NET experts so that you get a broad understanding of how industry wide experts work and think.
  • Discover tips and tricks about Linux Unix programming
  • Get your questions answered by easy to follow, organized Linux Unix experts
  • Get up to speed with vital Linux Unix programming tools
  • Save on travel expenses by learning right from your desk or home office. Enroll in an online instructor led class. Nearly all of our classes are offered in this way.
  • Prepare to hit the ground running for a new job or a new position
  • See the big picture and have the instructor fill in the gaps
  • We teach with sophisticated learning tools and provide excellent supporting course material
  • Books and course material are provided in advance
  • Get a book of your choice from the HSG Store as a gift from us when you register for a class
  • Gain a lot of practical skills in a short amount of time
  • We teach what we know…software
  • We care…
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Interesting Reads Take a class with us and receive a book of your choosing for 50% off MSRP.