JUnit, TDD, CPTC, Web Penetration Training Classes in Toledo, Ohio

Learn JUnit, TDD, CPTC, Web Penetration in Toledo, Ohio and surrounding areas via our hands-on, expert led courses. All of our classes either are offered on an onsite, online or public instructor led basis. Here is a list of our current JUnit, TDD, CPTC, Web Penetration related training offerings in Toledo, Ohio: JUnit, TDD, CPTC, Web Penetration Training

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It is rather unfortunate that in the ever changing and rapidly improving world of technology, we hardly remember the geniuses who through their inventions laid the foundation for many of the conveniences and features we now enjoy in our favorite communication devices.

This article is a tribute to the ten people who made these discoveries and an attempt to bring their achievements into the limelight.

1.      Marty Cooper

Did you know that Cooper was the first to file the patent in 1973, when he was already working for Motorola for the “radio telephone system”. The Cooper’s Law is his brainchild and to think that he himself was inspired to come out with the patent was Star Trek and its Captain Kirk is indeed revealing.

2. Mike Lazardidis
 

Anonymous reprint from Quora (career advice)

Occasionally we come across a unique profound perspective that makes one stop and really listen. The following advice is one such as this.

  1. Small actions compound: Reputation, career trajectory, and how others perceive you in the workplace can come down to a handful of things/moments that seem inconsequential/small at the time but compound. Random Thought: Redwood trees come from small seeds and time. With every action you're planting small seeds and these seeds can grow into something bigger (sometimes unimaginably bigger) over time. Don't let small basic mistakes sabotage your reputation because it only takes a few small snafus for people to lose confidence/trust in your ability to do more important tasks. Trust is a fragile thing and the sooner people can trust you the faster they'll give you more responsibility. Some Examples: Being on time (always) or early (better); spending an extra 10-15 minutes reviewing your work and catching basic mistakes before your boss does; structuring your work so it's easy for others to understand and leverage (good structure/footnotes/formatting); taking on unpleasant schleps/tasks (volunteer for them; don't complain; do it even when there's no apparent benefit to you)  

  2. Rising tide lifts all boats: Fact: You don't become CEO of a multi-billion dollar public company in your 30s based purely on ability/talent. Your career is a boat and it is at the mercy of tides. No matter how talented you are it's a lot harder to break out in a sluggish situation/hierarchy/economy than a go-go environment. Even if you're a superstar at Sluggish Co., your upside trajectory (more often than not) is fractional to what an average/below average employee achieves at Rocket Ship Co. There's a reason Eric Schmidt told Sheryl Sandberg to "Get on a Rocket Ship". I had colleagues accelerate their careers/income/title/responsibility simply because business demand was nose bleed high (go go economy) and they were at the right place at the right time to ride the wave. Contrast that to the 2008 bust where earnings/promotions/careers have been clamped down and people are thankful for having jobs let alone moving up. Yes talent still matters but I think people generally overweight individual talent and underweight economics when evaluating/explaining their career successes. Sheryl Sandberg Quote: When companies are growing quickly and they are having a lot of impact, careers take care of themselves. And when companies aren’t growing quickly or their missions don’t matter as much, that’s when stagnation and politics come in. If you’re offered a seat on a rocket ship, don’t ask what seat. Just get on.

  3. Seek opportunities where the outcome is success or failure. Nothing in between! You don't become a star doing your job. You become a star making things happen. I was once told early in my career that you learn the most in 1) rapidly growing organizations or 2) failing organizations.  I've been in both kinds of situations and wholeheartedly agree. Repeat. Get on a rocket ship. It'll either blow up or put you in orbit. Either way you'll learn a ton in a short amount of time. Put another way; seek jobs where you can get 5-10 years of work experience in 1-2 years.

  4. Career Tracks & Meritocracies don't exist: Your career is not a linear, clearly defined trajectory.  It will be messy and will move more like a step function.

  5. You will probably have champions and detractors on day 1: One interesting byproduct of the recruiting & hiring process of most organizations is it can create champions & detractors before you even start the job. Some folks might not like how you were brought into the organization (they might have even protested your hiring) and gun for you at every turn while others will give you the benefit of the doubt (even when you don't deserve one) because they stuck their neck out to hire you. We're all susceptible to these biases and few people truly evaluate/treat folks on a blank slate.

  6. You'll only be known for a few things. Make those labels count: People rely on labels as quick filters. Keep this in mind when you pick an industry/company/job role/school because it can serve as an anchor or elevator in the future. It's unfortunate but that's the way it is. You should always be aware of what your "labels" are.

  7. Nurture & protect your network and your network will nurture & protect you: Pay it forward and help people. Your network will be one of the biggest drivers of your success.

For those newly moving into the realm of programming, the important question to mull over is what programming language or technology to specialize in. On the other hand, those who are already working as a software developer, the constant worry remains whether their current technology would become obsolete very soon.

Both these concerns could be easily addressed by checking the list of programming languages that are highly in demand and formulating the career by modifying your specialization accordingly. The supply for the developers have not met with the demand in these programming languages yet, making them most viable options for career.

Popular Programming Languages Based on TIOBE Index

The top 10 list of programming languages which are highly in demand in 2014 is listed below in the order of popularity. These languages are identified from the TIOBE Programming Community index which consists of 20 top programming languages. TIOBE index is an indicator of the popularity of programming languages and is updated once in every month.  This index is calculated using multiple search engines, and the ratings are based on the number of skilled engineers world-wide, courses and third party vendors.

The interpreted programming language Python has surged in popularity in recent years. Long beloved by system administrators and others who had good use for the way it made routine tasks easy to automate, it has gained traction in other sectors as well. In particular, it has become one of the most-used tools in the discipline of numerical computing and analysis. Being put to use for such heavy lifting has endowed the language with a great selection of powerful libraries and other tools that make it even more flexible. One upshot of this development has been that sophisticated business analysts have also come to see the language as a valuable tool for those own data analysis needs.

Greatly appreciated for its simplicity and elegance of syntax, Python makes an excellent first programming language for previously non-technical people. Many business analysts, in fact, have had success growing their skill sets in this way thanks to the language's tractability. Long beloved by specialized data scientists, the iPython interactive computing environment has also attracted great attention within the business analyst’s community. Its instant feedback and visualization options have made it easy for many analysts to become skilled Python programmers while doing valuable work along the way.

Using iPython and appropriate notebooks for it, for example, business analysts can easily make interactive use of such tools as cohort analysis and pivot tables. iPython makes it easy to benefit from real-time, interactive researches which produce immediately visible results, including charts and graphs suitable for use in other contexts. Through becoming familiar with this powerful interactive application, business analysts are also exposing themselves in a natural and productive way to the Python programming language itself.

Gaining proficiency with this language opens up further possibilities. While interactive analytic techniques are of great use to many business analysts, being able to create fully functioning, independent programs is of similar value. Becoming comfortable with Python allows analysts to tackle and plumb even larger data sets than would be possible through an interactive approach, as results can be allowed to accumulate over hours and days of processing time.

This ability can sometime allow business analysts to address the so-called "Big Data" questions that can otherwise seem the sole province of specialized data scientists. More important than this higher level of independence, perhaps, is the fact that this increased facility with data analysis and handling allows analysts to communicate more effectively with such stakeholders. Through learning a programming language which allows them to begin making independent inroads into such areas, business analysts gain a better perspective on these specialized domains, and this allows them to function as even more effective intermediaries.

 

Related:

Who Are the Main Players in Big Data?

Tech Life in Ohio

Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, Benjamin Harrison, William McKinley, William H. Taft, and Warren G. Harding, were all U.S. Presidents born in Ohio. The first recognized university in Ohio was Ohio University founded in 1804. It wasn?t long until the first interracial and coeducational college in the United States, Oberlin, was founded in 1833. The Buckeye State produced some interesting discoveries such as: Charles Goodyear discovering the process of vulcanizing rubber in 1839; Roy J. Plunkett inventing Teflon in 1938; and Charles Kettering inventing the automobile self-starter in 1911.
Design without code is just a daydream. Code without design is a nightmare Assaad Chalhoub
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Software developers near Toledo have ample opportunities to meet like minded techie individuals, collaborate and expend their career choices by participating in Meet-Up Groups. The following is a list of Technology Groups in the area.
Fortune 500 and 1000 companies in Ohio that offer opportunities for JUnit, TDD, CPTC, Web Penetration developers
Company Name City Industry Secondary Industry
Nationwide Insurance Company Columbus Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Owens Corning Toledo Manufacturing Concrete, Glass, and Building Materials
FirstEnergy Corp Akron Energy and Utilities Gas and Electric Utilities
The Lubrizol Corporation Wickliffe Manufacturing Chemicals and Petrochemicals
Sherwin-Williams Cleveland Retail Hardware and Building Material Dealers
Key Bank Cleveland Financial Services Banks
TravelCenters of America, Inc. Westlake Retail Gasoline Stations
Dana Holding Company Maumee Manufacturing Automobiles, Boats and Motor Vehicles
O-I (Owens Illinois), Inc. Perrysburg Manufacturing Concrete, Glass, and Building Materials
Big Lots Stores, Inc. Columbus Retail Department Stores
Limited Brands, Inc. Columbus Retail Clothing and Shoes Stores
Cardinal Health Dublin Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotech Other
Progressive Corporation Cleveland Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
Parker Hannifin Corporation Cleveland Manufacturing Manufacturing Other
American Financial Group, Inc. Cincinnati Financial Services Insurance and Risk Management
American Electric Power Company, Inc Columbus Energy and Utilities Gas and Electric Utilities
Fifth Third Bancorp Cincinnati Financial Services Banks
Macy's, Inc. Cincinnati Retail Department Stores
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. Akron Manufacturing Plastics and Rubber Manufacturing
The Kroger Co. Cincinnati Retail Grocery and Specialty Food Stores
Omnicare, Inc. Cincinnati Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals and Biotech Pharmaceuticals
The Procter and Gamble Company Cincinnati Consumer Services Personal Care

training details locations, tags and why hsg

A successful career as a software developer or other IT professional requires a solid understanding of software development processes, design patterns, enterprise application architectures, web services, security, networking and much more. The progression from novice to expert can be a daunting endeavor; this is especially true when traversing the learning curve without expert guidance. A common experience is that too much time and money is wasted on a career plan or application due to misinformation.

The Hartmann Software Group understands these issues and addresses them and others during any training engagement. Although no IT educational institution can guarantee career or application development success, HSG can get you closer to your goals at a far faster rate than self paced learning and, arguably, than the competition. Here are the reasons why we are so successful at teaching:

  • Learn from the experts.
    1. We have provided software development and other IT related training to many major corporations in Ohio since 2002.
    2. Our educators have years of consulting and training experience; moreover, we require each trainer to have cross-discipline expertise i.e. be Java and .NET experts so that you get a broad understanding of how industry wide experts work and think.
  • Discover tips and tricks about JUnit, TDD, CPTC, Web Penetration programming
  • Get your questions answered by easy to follow, organized JUnit, TDD, CPTC, Web Penetration experts
  • Get up to speed with vital JUnit, TDD, CPTC, Web Penetration programming tools
  • Save on travel expenses by learning right from your desk or home office. Enroll in an online instructor led class. Nearly all of our classes are offered in this way.
  • Prepare to hit the ground running for a new job or a new position
  • See the big picture and have the instructor fill in the gaps
  • We teach with sophisticated learning tools and provide excellent supporting course material
  • Books and course material are provided in advance
  • Get a book of your choice from the HSG Store as a gift from us when you register for a class
  • Gain a lot of practical skills in a short amount of time
  • We teach what we know…software
  • We care…
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